Who are the top 3 greatest mathmaticians in probability and statistics?

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  Ron Geis 1 year, 1 month ago.

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  • #2299

    Xi Zhang
    Keymaster

    There are a thousand Hamlets in a thousand people’s eyes. How do you think who are the top 3 greatest mathmaticians in your mind?

     

     

    #2300

    Kaibo Liu
    Keymaster

    Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299:

    I will say Gauss, Newton, and Galileo. 🙂

    #2303

    pengpai
    Participant

    Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299:

    Gauss, one who is as smart as god.

    Cauchy, numerous Cauchy theorems in Advanced Math. Complex Variables.

    Riemann, founder of Riemann geometry, which successfully express the curved space of general relativity. I have never seen a Mathematic tool applied to physical world so well.

    #2304

    duanyuncheng
    Participant

    Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299:

    Lagrange, Gauss, and Maxwell.

    Maxwell: physics statistics

     

    #2305

    pengpai
    Participant

    Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299:

    Sorry I omitted the restriction in statistics.

    Then I may still say Gauss and Cauchy. Another one I’d like to mention is Markoff, who’s name not only appears in Statistics but also Economics and Biology.

    #2307

    Fernando Crespo
    Participant

    Dear Friends:
    To me is very clear:
    The Maximal Mind: Andrei Kolmogorov. http://www.kolmorgorov.com
    The new problems: Ronald Fischer
    The extrange solutions: Jerzy Neyman, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerzy_Neyman, advisor of Dantzig.

    #2309

    songjin
    Participant

    As far as I can see,Gauss,Euler and David Hilbert could be the top 3 greatest mathmaticians in my mind!

    #2310

    bloodymask
    Participant

    Personally, I admire Poisson, Laplace and Fermat. But absolutely there are many other great mathmaticians who contribute much in this field.

    #2313

    Nathan Vangen
    Participant

    Tough to constrict it to only 3, but I would say Gauss, Laplace, and Markov.

    #2315

    Ziyu Liang
    Participant

    Could I say Alan Turing as one of the top 3? I’ve just watched the movie The Imitation Game B4 and this guy really gives me a nice impression. Surprising that Mom majored in CS in the college but knows nothing about him 🙂

    ps: no idea in a mathmatic fool’s mind about the other two 233

    #2316

    Chao Wang
    Participant

    Maybe Gauss, Markov and Bayes

    #2325

    queenie
    Participant

    Actually, as a student majoring in science, though I’ve learned a lot about math but I have to admit that I know nothing about the great mathematician except some who usually appear in the textbook.

    I found some information in the PowerPoint for the class and got some useful information. In my view, every scientist or mathematician is intelligent and great, they all actually made something. So it’s hard to pick out the greatest, and I just make my choice by measuring how much information I know about him or her and how often I see her or his name.

    The first one is Carl Gauss. I don’t think there actually exists a reason for his not being picked. Sometimes, I think he shouldn’t be considered a man, but a alien from Mars. He knew so much, including number theory, geometry, differential geometry and balabala. There are so many number thing or math thing, oh I feel dizzy now, so let’s put this aside.

    The second one is Pierre Laplace. One of the deepest impression is the Laplace Equation, which has tortured me for the whole two year since I started my “colorful” engineering life! How can I forget it!

    The third one is Jacob Bernoulli. I don’t know whether I have mistaken this person with another one, but I only remember the Bernoulli Equation in ODE class, which brings me the most pain except the Mathematical Analysis class. And according to the material I’ve found about him, before he “trapped” himself in math, he was actually a artist and also the <span id=”blng_part_tran_1_5″ class=”” data-aligning=”#blng_part_src_1_4,#blng_part_tran_1_5″>Master</span> of <span id=”blng_part_tran_1_7″ class=”” data-aligning=”#blng_part_src_1_3,#blng_part_tran_1_7″>Theology and then he should study math himself! I just don’t wanna say a word about this kind of genius.</span>

    #2333

    Jiang Yu
    Participant
    <p class=”ordinary-output target-output”><span class=””>Gauss, found the normal distribution, for the study of random error, proposed the least square method to establish a linear regression equation.</span></p>
    <p class=”ordinary-output target-output”><span class=””>Laplasse, extended central limit theorem, points out that the two distribution can be approximated by normal distribution.</span></p>
    <p class=”ordinary-output target-output”><span class=””>Kolmogorov, he not only obtained the necessary and sufficient conditions for the sequence of random variables to obey the law of large numbers, but also published a book on the basis of probability theory in 1933.</span></p>

    #2334

    50plus
    Participant

    Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299: Reply to Xi Zhang of #2299:

     

     

     

    #2335

    50plus
    Participant

    The first one is Blaise Pascal. He devised a very famous argument known as “Pascal’s Wagers” which says that one must believe that God exists because: (1) if God doesn’t exist, you lose almost nothing; (2) if God exists, you will go to heaven, and your gain is infinite; (3) therefore, the expected value of your gain is infinite, no matter how small the probability of the existence of God may be.
    The second is Francis Galton. He devised a very ingenious apparatus to demonstrate the Central Limit Theorem: it is called a “Galton board”.
    The third is Pierre-Simon de Laplace. Here is a very important problem solved by Laplace in his “Essai philosophique sur la théorie des probabilités”: if an event occurs k times out of n independent trials, what is the probability that it occur on the (n+1)th trial?The answer is (k+1)/(n+2), and it is called the “rule of succession”. It is still a very important result of bayesian probabilities.And his name is engraved to the Eiffel Tower.

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